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What the Elder Justice Act is, and why it matters

June 17, 2009 1 comment

The Elder Justice Act (S. 795 / H.R. 2006) creates a combined law enforcement and public health approach to study, detect, treat, prosecute and, most importantly, prevent elder abuse, neglect and exploitation.  After 25 years of congressional hearings on elder abuse without a legislative response, the Elder Justice Act marks the beginning of new horizons in the detection and prevention of elder abuse.

The Elder Justice Act would:

  • Bring elder justice the national attention it needs and deserves.
  • Improve the quality, quantity and accessibility of information about elder abuse.
  • Provide training to combat elder abuse, neglect and exploitation and develop larger forensic capacity and increase prosecution.
  • Increase funding for adult protective services across the country and also provide for victim assistance, “safe havens,” and support for at-risk elders.

Why is this law needed?

  • The number of older Americans is fast growing, and so is the problem of elder abuse, neglect and exploitation.
  • Support is needed for state and community efforts and those who work on the front lines to prevent, fight and prosecute elder abuse
  • Currently, there are scarce resources and fragmented systems devoted to elder justice across the country.
  • There is inadequate public-private infrastructure and resources to prevent, detect, treat, understand, intervene in and, where appropriate, prosecute elder abuse, neglect and exploitation.
  • Elder justice is the right of every older person to be free of abuse, neglect and exploitation.

What would the Act do?
The Elder Justice Act would provide federal resources to support State and community efforts to fight elder abuse.
The Elder Justice Act would promote both aspects of elder justice with the following provisions:

  • Bring elder justice the national attention it needs and deserves.
  • Improve the quality, quantity and accessibility of information about elder abuse.
  • Increase security, collaboration, and consumer information on Long-Term Care.
  • Develop larger forensic capacity and increase prosecution.
  • Provide victim assistance, “safe havens,” and support for at-risk elders.
  • Provide training to combat elder abuse, neglect and exploitation.
  • Include special programs to support underserved populations including rural, minority and Indian seniors.
  • Increase knowledge and support promising projects and study model state laws and practices.
  • Ensure evaluation of “what works” and accountability for funds spent.

For more information and resources, please visit the Elder Justice Coalition’s website.